Neil Diamond - tendency of Feb 19

Neil Diamond

Information about Neil Diamond

Wiki source

Diamond began to feel restricted by Bang Records, because he wanted to record more ambitious, introspective music, like his autobiographical "Brooklyn Roads" from 1968. Berns wanted to release "Kentucky Woman" as a single, but Diamond was no longer satisfied writing simple pop songs, so he proposed that "Shilo", which was not about the Civil War, but rather an imaginary childhood friend while Bang believed that the song wasn't commercial enough, so it was relegated to being an LP track on "Just for You". In addition to being dissatisfied with his royalties, Diamond tried to sign with another record label after discovering a loophole in his contract that did not bind him exclusively to either WEB IV or Tallyrand, but the result was a series of lawsuits that coincided with a slump in his record sales and professional success. A magistrate refused WEB IV's request for a temporary injunction to prevent Diamond from joining another record company while his contract dispute continued in court, but the lawsuits persisted until February 18, 1977, when he triumphed in court and purchased the rights to his Bang-era master tapes. :51